More than 2 000 participants showed that people with good self-control have better habits

By |2017-03-04T09:16:09+00:00February 15th, 2017|Categories: Personal Success|Tags: , , , |

… as such: regular exercise, eating healthy food, and getting enough sleep.

So clear. 🙂

Galla B, Duckworth AL., “More than resisting temptation: Beneficial habits mediate the relationship between self-control and positive life outcomes.”, J Pers Soc Psychol. 2015 Sep;109(3):508-25. doi: 10.1037/pspp0000026. Epub 2015 Feb 2.

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The study showed that children who have been turned away from the prize could wait longer than children focused on the prize.

By |2017-03-04T09:18:35+00:00February 14th, 2017|Categories: Personal Success|Tags: , , |

In study preschool children could obtain a less preferred reward immediately or continue waiting indefinitely for a more preferred but delayed reward

Mischel W, Ebbesen EB, Zeiss AR.; “Cognitive and attentional mechanisms in delay of gratification.”; J Pers Soc Psychol. 1972 Feb;21(2):204-18.

 

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Participants who used the implementation intentions lost weight at an average of 1 kg per person more than others.

By |2017-02-13T11:56:40+00:00February 13th, 2017|Categories: Personal Success|Tags: , , |

Implementation intentions relied on speaking to himself. For example: “When I open the refrigerator, I will think of dieting.”

Mischel W, Ebbesen EB, Zeiss AR., “Cognitive and attentional mechanisms in delay of gratification.“, J Pers Soc Psychol. 1972 Feb;21(2):204-18.

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The mindbus technique for resisting chocolate

By |2017-03-04T09:20:44+00:00February 13th, 2017|Categories: Personal Success|Tags: , , |

Only 27 percent of the mindbus group ate chocolates from their bag as compared with 45 percent of students in the control group.

Participants saw any thought of chocolate as a strange passenger. They coped with them by changing their voice, singing, or showing who is boss.The mindbus technique for resisting chocolate

Jenkins, K., and Tapper, K. (2013). Resisting chocolate temptation using a brief mindfulness strategy. British Journal of Health Psychology DOI: 10.1111/bjhp.12050

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Make a SINGLE plan for the moment when your willpower is low.

By |2017-03-04T09:23:04+00:00February 12th, 2017|Categories: Personal Success|Tags: , , |

For example: “If I wanted to eat a sweet I would eat an apple.”

A larger number of plans than the one for every temptation decreased its effectiveness.

Aukje A. C. Verhoeven, Marieke A. Adriaanse, Denise T. D. de Ridder, Emely de Vet, and Bob M. Fennis (2013). Less is more: The effect of multiple implementation intentions targeting unhealthy snacking habits. European Journal of Social Psychology DOI: 10.1002/ejsp.1963

 

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Research shows that leaders work even harder the more they use willpower.

By |2017-02-12T09:28:09+00:00February 12th, 2017|Categories: Personal Success, Productivity|Tags: , , |

When willpower is on the verge, they shift the mindset of a tired tri-athlete:  just keep going, you can do it.

DeWall C. N., Baumeister, R. F., Mead, N. L., & Vohs, K. D. (2011). How leaders self-regulate their task performance: Evidence that power promotes diligence, depletion, and disdain. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100, 47-65.

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Higher scores of participants with self-control were linked with higher grades than usual.

By |2017-03-04T09:25:43+00:00February 12th, 2017|Categories: Personal Success|Tags: , , |

They reported higher self-esteem and less eating or alcohol abuse. They also noted better relationships and interpersonal skills.

Tangney, J., Baumeister, R., & Boone, A.L. (2004). High self-control predicts good adjustment, less pathology, better grades, and interpersonal success. Journal of Personality, 72, 271-324.

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Self-control predicts future health, earnings and committed the crime very well

By |2017-03-04T09:25:35+00:00February 12th, 2017|Categories: Personal Success, Productivity|Tags: , , |

The researchers concluded this after monitoring more than 1,000 children from birth to 32 years of age.

Moffitt TE, Arseneault L, Belsky D, et al. A gradient of childhood self-control predicts health, wealth, and public safety. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2011;108(7):2693-2698. doi:10.1073/pnas.1010076108.

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